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Young Writers

Limericks Poetry Writing Workshop

Definition

A limerick is often a humorous verse with a strong beat. They make people laugh. Limericks are great to learn as they help develop vocabulary, sentence structure and let you use your imagination. The best part, they can be as bizarre as you like!

Explaination

Limericks consist of 5 lines. The first line normally begins with 'There was a . . .' and ends with a name, person or place. The last line normally has an unusual or far-fetched ending. As for the poem structure it’s simple! Lines 1, 2 and 5 have 7-10 syllables and rhyme, and lines 3 and 4 have 5 to 7 syllables and rhyme.

The most well-known limerick writer is Edward Lear, writer of ‘The Owl and the Pussycat’. His ideas were based on the sounds of nursery rhymes and his limericks proved to be such a success he published his own book called ‘Edward Lear: A Book of Nonsense’ which is still enjoyed today. Here is one of Edward Lear’s limericks:

Examples

An Example of a Limerick

'There was an old man with a beard
Who said, ‘It is just as I feared,
Two owls and a hen
A lark and a wren
Have all built their nests in my beard!'

Your Turn

Finished? Why not submit your poem to Young Writers and we will enter it into one of our competitions.

Alternatively send your poem to:

Young Writers, Remus House, Coltsfoot Drive, Woodston, Peterborough, PE2 9BF or email it to info@youngwriters.co.uk