Twisted Tales |
Creative Writing Competition

11-18 Years

Twisted Tales Video

Can your students flip the narrative and write from the villain's point of view?

A fantastic way to explore character perspectives and empathy through creative writing...

How much does a story change if we change the point of view? What would the villain say if they could share their story? Are the bad guys evil? Misguided? Misunderstood? Twisted Tales is a fantastic opportunity to flip the script and explore another side of the story.

These fantastic resources support your students to get involved in this competition. There are two differentiated lesson plans, 8 gripping story starters which complement 8 plot ideas.

Starting with sequels and prequels, moving into redemption, and even questioning who the real villain is, Twisted Tales is accessible from Year 7 through to sixth form.

Use the video to engage your students, then there is the planning sheet to help structure their story and even lots of examples to help get their creativity flowing.

Get your students buzzing about creative writing today with Twisted Tales!



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Rules

To make sure your entries are valid, please follow the rules listed below:

  • Only one entry per student, there is no limit to the number of entries per school. Teachers please submit your entries altogether where possible!

  • Your students' entries must be their own work.

  • Mini sagas can be submitted on the entry form or an A4 sheet of paper or typed (on a computer or using the Online Writing Portal)

  • Each student's name, age and school name should be included on their entry.

  • 100-word limit for mini sagas (excluding the title).

  • Story starters are optional, but must be included in the word count if used.

If you are unsure on any rules or have any queries, please don't hesitate to Contact Us.

For Schools

1st Prize

The Young Writers' Award of Excellence and an awesome book bundle.

2 x Runners-Up

Each wins a framed certificate and a selection of books.

PLUS

Every participating school receives a free copy of the book their students feature in!

(Winners will be chosen from entries received in the 2021/2022 academic year.)

For Students

Our 5 favourite published poets will each win a trophy and a Complete Writer's Toolkit - Young Adult Edition.
This amazing prize lets the budding author plan, write and publish their own book!

PLUS

Every entrant receives a bookmark and we award a certificate of merit for all young writers chosen for publication.

(Winners will be chosen from entries received in the Autumn Term 2021.)

Online

Send your entries by uploading them:

Enter Now

Enter through our student writing portal:

Writing Portal

Alternatively, you can email your entries to [email protected].

By Post

Send your entries, along with your school entry form, to:

FREEPOST RSLY-AUJA-RAHY
Young Writers SS
Remus House
Peterborough
PE2 9BF

Writing Tips


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Tip #1

To help get students started split them into pairs.

Each pair needs to come up with a hero and a villain connected to each other. They then should take on the roles, one is the hero the other the villain, to debate the actions of the villain and the reason they took the path they did.

For example, the hero could look at why they consider the villain to be a villain and the villain could explain their reasoning behind what they’ve done. It’s a great way to come up with ideas!

Tip #2

Ask your students to take a closer look at the start and end of their plot.

The beginning of a story is very important as it sets the tone of the piece and invites the reader in – an intriguing first line can really hook the reader. Does their opening sentence contain action, description or a question? Something that piques the readers' interest?

Equally important is the ending. Whether or not the reader is given a conclusive ending or is left with a cliffhanger, it’s important the reader is left satisfied and sure of where the story ends or could end. The ending should match with the excitement of the opening… does it make sense? Is it dramatic or unexpected? Is there a cliff-hanger or a happy ever after?

Tip #3

We can all agree that what makes a really great story is its uniqueness. Twisted Tales is perfect for this as it encourages the writer to create a plot based on a viewpoint we would possibly never consider, that of the villain’s.

Encourage your students to really sink into the character they have chosen to give us, the reader, a viewpoint we would never have expected. Ask them to imagine they are the character, what’s their story? Why? Who made them like this? When did it happen? What event created the villain in them?

Finally, have a group discussion to help your students plan their story and finalise their idea to write about.

Tip #4

When writing stories, it’s very easy to get carried away with a lot of details that might not be necessary to the plot. For example, while it’s nice to know what the character’s name, age, description and hobbies are, plus any background information, adding this may mean the 100-word limit is reached before the story reaches the conclusion!

To avoid this, ask students to be aware of what is essential to the plot and what isn't. They could write down key points or use a story mountain to help them identify the essential elements of their story.

Get In Touch

Post
FREEPOST RSLY-AUJA-RAHY
Young Writers SS
Remus House
Peterborough
PE2 9BF

Email
[email protected]

Tel
(01733) 890066

Closing Date: Friday 17th December 2021